In Defense of Yoko Ono

“Yoko is as important to me as Paul and Dylan rolled into one. I don’t think she will get recognition until she’s dead. There’s me, and maybe I could count the people on one hand that have any conception of what she is or what her mind is like, or what her work means.” John Lennon In the middle of rolling my wheelchair from one room to another, Yoko Ono suddenly entered my brain. Immediately i began to wonder when i first became familiar with her. Similar to Winnie Mandela, Amy Jacques Garvey, Shirley Graham DuBois or Mama Zondeni Sobukwe, . . .

Shot from African Liberation Day organized by the Thomas Sankara Center in Burkina Faso

Neo-Colonialism is Inherently Patriarchal

I was asked to talk about women fighting for Pan-African unity against neo-colonialism but one of the things that came up on our call when I was preparing for this was neo-colonialism as an inherently patriarchal system of exploitation. So I want to begin by talking about the ways in which neo-colonialism is inherently patriarchal. As we may know, colonialism and neo-colonialism impact every facet of life for colonized peoples so there is no way to analyze any aspect of our lives while ignoring the reality of neo-colonialism and imperialism, but since neo-colonialism is fundamentally an economic system, I want . . .

Afro-Colombian women on the front line, building revolutionary feminism

How Afro-Colombians are Fighting White Feminism

To truly protect and liberate Black women in Latin America we must move away from the dominant liberal white feminist movement and instead call for the end of neoliberal led armed conflict, racist over policing, and demand Land rights and the redistribution of Land back to Black and Indigenous folx! . . .

Amy Jacques Garvey - Liberation Archives - Women as Leaders

Women as Leaders

The exigencies of this present age require that women take their places beside their men. White women are rallying all their forces and uniting regardless of national boundaries to save their race from destruction, and preserve its ideals for posterity. . . . White men have begun to realize that as women are the backbone of the home, so can they, by their economic experience and their aptitude for details, participate effectively in guiding the destiny of nation and race. No line of endeavor remains closed for long to the modern woman. She agitates for equal opportunities and gets them; . . .

Claudia Jones- International Women's Day and the Struggle for Peace (1950)

International Women’s Day and the Struggle for Peace

Written by Claudia Jones in 1950 Women in the Struggle For Peace and Security On International Women’s Day this year, millions of women in the world-wide camp of peace headed by the mighty land of Socialism will muster their united forces to make March 8, 1950, a day of demonstrative struggle for peace, freedom and women’s rights.  In our own land, there will be over fifty celebrations. On New York’s Lower East Side, original site of this historic American-born day of struggle for equal rights for women, and in major industrial states, such as Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, California, Massachusetts, . . .

Revolutionary African woman Assata Shakur

Working-Class African Women in Revolution

It is the purpose of this piece to provide historical examples of how working-class African women, joined and supported by working-class African men, combatted the shackles of racism, colonialism, and imperialism regardless of their geographical position. We will use the women of Dahomey, Assata Shakur, and Claudia Jones as examples of significant working-class women who contributed greatly to African Liberation. . . .

Cuban propaganda celebrating revolutionary African women

Celebrating Revolutionary African Women

This month the editors of Hood Communist will be celebrate revolutionary African working class women and their contributions to the struggle for African liberation. To kick off the celebration, here are five revolutionary African women you should know. . . .

Rest in Power, Toyin Salau

For Toyin Salau

I feel a great rage for the African man that violated Toyin and took her life, but I understand he is a pure creation of the most evil global enemy this planet has ever known. He is a victim in his own way, doomed to a cycle of violence that only total revolution will break, though maybe too late for him. I feel a profound sadness and grief for Toyin’s light extinguished too soon but I also know that there will be many many thousands more women and girls who will suffer like her – new ones every day – until we defeat this enemy once and for all. . . .