LOOKING

for Sekou Odinga what can be said of warriors besides thank you or maybe words aren’t of any use at all still silence seems disrespectful too pigs came knockin and caught your shadow in a glimpse in a whisper rumors of you spread over radios spread across every borough and then straight over the Atlantic to the brinks of liberation movements at the high stage war here and there is all the same when you know which side of empire you stand those of us who know enough know better than to say goodbye or think this is over your . . .

for Ruchell “Cinque” Magee

runaway in a heavy fog of gunfire survivor of the whirlwind decades down but never silent they thought they caged you i want to mention forgiveness ask if we deserve any in this life for not shooting the gates til the doors fell to their knees til the solitary hole echoed your absence so loud the prison imploded can we say you’re free now or that you haven’t always been how dare we say rest in _____ when you got so much retroactive livin to catch up on now with all the chains of mortality melted away brother they think . . .

The Life of Winnie Mandela

The following text was reprinted from Black Women in South Africa and the Case of Winnie Mandela, by the Winnie Mandela Solidarity Coalition, c/o BCLSA, box 8791, Boston, MA. 02114. The Winnie Mandela Solidarity Coalition (WMSC) was formed in Boston, Massachusetts in response to the interest generated by a forum on repression in South Africa held by the Third World Women’s Organization. The goals of the WMSC were to build a campaign to free Winnie Mandela and other women political prisoners in South Africa and to educate, organize, and involve individual women and women’s organizations in support of South African . . .

Albert Woodfox seated in a kitchen, smiling and holding a copy of his book Solitary.

Albert Woodfox, Angola Three Warrior, passes.

Who has not heard of the Angola Three, three young black prisoners who were falsely accused of killing a prison guard in 1972 in the infamous Louisiana maximum security prison cited at a former slave plantation—and named for the place where the African captives came from, Angola. On Thursday, August 4th, attorneys for Albert Woodfox announced his passing at the age of 75. For over 43 years, Woodfox and several other black men were held in brutal solitary confinement, one of the longest held solitary prisoners on earth: 43 years, seven days a week, 23 hours a day. The United . . .

Black Myths Podcast: The Indiana Prisoner Rebellion of 1985 Pt. 2

The Indiana Prisoner Rebellion of 1985 Pt. 2

Continuing the focus on the Indiana prisoner rebellion in 1985 at the Indiana Reformatory (now Pendleton Correctional Facility), this interview spotlights Christopher “Naeem” Trotter. Trotter, in solidarity with John C. Cole aka Balagoon and their comrades, led the takeover of a cellblock inside the Indiana reformatory for 15 hours. . . .

George Jackson: Black Revolutionary by Walter Rodney

George Jackson: Black Revolutionary

By Walter Rodney, November 1971 To most readers in this continent, starved of authentic information by the imperialist news agencies, the name of George Jackson is either unfamiliar or just a name. The powers that be in the United States put forward the official version that George Jackson was a dangerous criminal kept in maximum security in Americas toughest jails and still capable of killing a guard at Soledad Prison. They say that he himself was killed attempting escape this year in August. Official versions given by the United States of everything from the Bay of Pigs in Cuba to . . .

African prisoners of war

Prisoners of War

Our ancestors, our elders, our (New) Afrikan Liberation prisoners of war suffering the most heightened forms of bestial oppression in america’s concentration camps, deserve more than flowery tributes and toothless appeals to a conscienceless empire. Only the naive or willfully ignorant can not see the failure of the ‘left’ to truly acknowledge the existence of or work toward the release of our political prisoners and prisoners of war. . . .