A People's Program member at the People's Breakfast in Oakland, an example of a revolutionary as opposed to missionary program.

Are You a Missionary or a Revolutionary?

In a recent panel, Delency posed the question to his fellow panelists: “are you a missionary or a revolutionary?” The question naturally arose since the panel featured groups and people who are actively participating in food and community programs. Over the course of the discussion, it became clear that folks are engaged in the work for different reasons. Two members of People’s Programs (Yemi & Delency) participated in the panel and it was their goal to have an honest conversation with the other panelists (and themselves) about why they are doing this work: to make themselves feel good, or to . . .

Cooperation Jackson member waters som plants

The Jackson-Kush Plan & the Struggle for Land

While the land relationships that dominate this society have implications for every relation in society, the recent crisis of gentrification and forced removal in low income Black communities, along with the volatile boom-bust real estate cycles, has made the struggle for adequate housing the most pronounced battleground in an increasingly intense war over the vision for the future of how we relate, prioritize and manage access to land. . . .

Sowing the Seeds of revolution - collective production

Sowing the Seeds of Revolution

Each week of African Liberation Month, we will be offering something from the archives of the African Liberation Struggle as a centering piece of the theme. In keeping with this week’s theme “Organization is the Only Way!”, we hope that ancestor Samora Machel’s reflection on the necessity of using revolutionary organization to build true self-determination will help us reflect on the disorganization of the current moment, and how we can move collectively to overcome it. . . .

Derek Chauvin in court

Communal Justice & the Derek Chauvin Verdict

In the wake of this verdict there are those in New African communities who are proclaiming it an instance of justice served. For communities that rarely see their killers and brutalizers prosecuted, it’s understandable any instance of a conviction would be hailed as great justice. You could argue that it’s a great justice for George Floyd’s family and it would be hard to disagree with that. But, as a victim of colonial brutality, George Floyd doesn’t just belong to his immediate family but to the entire movement for New African liberation. It was the entire movement, after all, that brought his murder to light. Which is why it’s crucial that we understand matters of justice and accountability not just in individual terms but in communal terms. . . .