An African holds a piece of lettuce.

Unreading Colonial Food Systems

Originally published in the August 2021 Out of Print Newsletter by the Noname Reads Book Club ︎︎Like many people who went through U.S. public school systems, I am intimately familiar with institutional food; canned vegetables, square cut pizza, frozen & highly processed mystery meats, syrupy fruit cups, all of that. Institutional food is low-cost, low in nutritional value, and arguably pretty gross. I remember asking our school superintendent why our cafeteria wasn’t able to purchase food from the vibrant community of local farmers. He told me that our school was bound up in a large multi-year contract with a number . . .

Graffiti on a sidewalk says "abolish the police"

On Police Abolition: Decolonization Is The Only Way

If Black masses are semi-colonized, the solution is decolonization. If slavery was merely reformed, slavery must be abolished in all its iterations. The U.S. police are the representation and manifestation of modern-day slave patrols. For these reasons and others, the police must be abolished in their entirety and other carceral institutions as well. . . .

African Liberation Day: We Unify or We Die

#AfricanLiberationDay: We Unify or We Die

African people’s struggle against oppression, colonialism, zionism, and imperialism is commemorated each year with African Liberation Day. Founded on April 15th,1958 by Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, the First Conference of Independent States was held in Accra, Ghana, and attended by eight independent African states. It aimed to create awareness and amplify decolonization struggles and symbolize African nations’ determination to free themselves from foreign domination and exploitation. . . .

Protest against General Iron in Chicago

Do or Die: Black Liberation and the Climate Apocalypse

The history of the European World, the history of the West, is a history of colonization and exploitation. Wherever they go, destruction, dehumanization, and degradation follow. As Indigenous and African civilizations have shown us, we are the land, and the land is a part of us. When the land dies, we do as well. . . .

Marx was a colonizer, not a communist

Marx was a colonizer, not a communist

Karl Marx did not invent socialism. Marx stated himself that he got the idea of an equal society without economic oppression from studying pre-colonial Africans and pre-colonial indigenous people of Turtle Island, the ‘Americas.’ . . .

The Compensation is Freedom

Capitalism preys on revolutionary strategy. It eats Black culture for breakfast. It siphons organic energy from the impetus of movement workers. In the 21st century, the Non-Profit Industrial Complex is its primary agent in this pursuit. That the NPIC monopolizes movement resources is accepted quite unanimously throughout radical, Black spaces. And, yet, there is a conspicuous lack of acknowledgment of Black complicity in this phenomenon. Black movement workers regard their own relationship to nonprofit malpractice as inevitable or as minimally harmful given the choices they are faced in navigating a capitalist, racialized society. The Black movement worker’s role in commercializing . . .

Reenvisioning Harm Reduction As Reparations

Last year marked the 400th anniversary of the commencement of the Transatlantic Slave Trade in North America.  As politicians and others began announcing their plans to run for President, reparations once again became a prominent mainstream talking point. Subsequently, a historic hearing held by the House Judiciary Committee in Washington DC, on the question of reparations, coincided with Juneteenth.  The intent of the hearing was not to determine reparations but, instead, determine if the H.R. 40 bill, a bill to convene a commission to study, document, quantify and make recommendations for reparations, should move forward. For over a century, despite . . .

The Colonization of Time

As impossible as it may seem the settler has managed to colonize the abstract phenomenon that is time itself. I refer to “time” here as both a resource that is violently exploited from the working-class colonized masses and a way of measuring the passing of the present. Human beings have always measured time by looking at nature. Whether it’s using the sun, the moon,  or the seasons we have always looked to nature to keep track of the passing of time. The Ancient Egyptians used large obelisks to track the movement of the sun, to measure the passing of time. . . .